Alli-C in Caps & Gel  Specials

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Special  $38.00 or 3-7 $35.00

Special Prices

Special Prices


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The Cream For that perfect protection Read on

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Alliderm Gel

Gel


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Alli-C Capsules & Alliderm Gel

"Antibiotics present an excellent example of over-dependence on modern medicine.  Staphylococcus aureus is a common bacterium that lives on our skin and in our noses.  It is capable of causing many types of infections and diseases (e.g., impetigo, cellulitis, pneumonia, meningitis).  Penicillin has been used as an antimicrobial to kill this organism.  But, even in the early half of the 1900s, resistance to penicillin was being observed.  In 1945, it was noted that 14% of Staphylococcus aureus was resistant to penicillin.  By 1950, the figure had increased 59%.  And by 1995, 95% of this bacterium was resistant.  Though some of this resistance is the product of over-use of antibiotics and improper use (e.g., failure to take the full course of a prescribed antibiotic), it is also the fault of modern practice and its view of medicines.  Contemporary researchers are always seeking the "magic bullet" chemical that has the highest activity against various harmful (or potentially harmful) organisms.  This often leads them to isolate or synthesize a single chemical for various medications.  Penicillin is a single mycochemical (i.e., a chemical molecule produced by a fungus).  It is much easier for a bacterial population to achieve resistance to this relatively simple antimicobial medication than to gain resistance to Allium sativum (garlic) that utilizes whole plant preparations.  The reason is very simple - plants (and other medicinal organisms) usually do not contain a single active chemical; rather, they contain a suite of related chemicals that act in a synergistic fashion within the body.  Allium sativum contains at least 35 active phytochemicals (e.g., ajoene, allicin, aline, allixin, allyl methyl thisulfinate, dimethyl disulfide).  It is very difficult for bacteria to develop resistance and avoid the impact  of numerous phytochemicals and their complex interactions."   Ancestral Plants by Arthur Haines pg. 22. 

Watch these two interviews with 

Dr Joshling the creator of Alli C

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